Aqua-Bound posi-lok vs. snap button touring paddle

Discussion in 'Gear Talk' started by dmon707, May 23, 2019.

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  1. dmon707

    dmon707 Paddler

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    Does anyone have experience with the new(ish) posi-lok paddles from Aqua-Bound? I like the idea of corrosion free paddles, but worry about losing a paddle part while paddling at sea. I always use 4-part paddles so that they will fly with my Feathercraft. I have to treat the extra snap button joints at the blades with special care after trips to keep the metal from corroding (Boe-shield T-9), but snap button joints don't separate accidentally.
     
  2. JohnAbercrombie

    JohnAbercrombie Paddler

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    I have no experience with the Posi-Lok, so can't answer your question.
    A few thoughts:
    Like the Werner ferrule, it seems that the Posi-Lok allows 15 degree increments in the 'feather angle'.

    With the snap button, it's usually straight or 60 degrees left or right as the choices.

    So, if you paddle with zero feather, the button is still probably the simpler choice, IMO.

    Snap buttons (the standard ones) are stainless and easily replaceable, but a bit of lengthwise and radial 'wiggle' is common. Snap button paddles can usually be shortened if you are a DIY-er.

    In the Posi-Lok video, the Aquabound spokesman makes a point of stating that there's no lengthwise or radial movement.
    However, in my experience, it's the 'bending' movement that's more of a problem. I recently repaired a friend's Werner where the wall of the tube had been worn right through at the ferrule end, on the side facing the paddler, through hundreds of thousands of small movements.

    For the center ferrule, I don't understand why it's (almost) only wing paddles that have the length and angle easily adjustable, with a very secure wiggle-proof fastener. Some of the Lendal paddles had length and angle adjustable, but the lock requires a hex key to remove the last of the 'play' in the connector.
    The Lendal hex key fastener seems excellent for the blade attachment, but I haven't actually put many miles on mine.
     
  3. dmon707

    dmon707 Paddler

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    Thank you John. Absent a warning, I guess I'll try the new thing. The parts DO click in, so the blades have about as much chance of falling of as the click button blades, I suppose.
     
  4. mick_allen

    mick_allen Paddler & Moderator

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    Posilock video:


    I'm not familiar with aquabound paddles, but I was astonished in the video at the small overlap of the two sections. Other than a stainless steel ferrule [2 1/2" overlap], the others I have are at 3 1/2" [wing paddle], 3 7/8" [couple of werners], and 4" [ c/f button ferrule].
    I abuse my paddles [extended practice, sitting on, etc] and personally would prefer as strong as possible - and so would be suspicious at first glance. But I do not know how well they're made just by looking at the video. but it looks odd.

    AquaBnd-PosiLock.jpg
     

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  5. JohnAbercrombie

    JohnAbercrombie Paddler

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    What's your estimate of the overlap? It looks like 3-4" to me, but it's hard to tell by looking.

    I just checked the 'overlap' on a few paddles in my collection here:
    Wings- from 3 1/8" to 4" - when extended to maximum length, more overlap when shortened
    Lendal - 3 1/2"
    Werner snap button (older) 4"
    Werner splined variable feather (newer style) 3 1/2" counting the spline, but the actual contact length is a lot less (about 1 3/8")

    werner .jpg werner detail .jpg
     
  6. mick_allen

    mick_allen Paddler & Moderator

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    My rough estimate of the posilock is 3". In general for Werners, I would take the whole extension including the splines as the spline connection is fully supported . . . but your werners with the necked down region are 'interesting' in respect to that region not being supported and all the stress being localized at the little 1/8" or 3/16" region right at the join. That extreme female end would presumably have the highest stress.
     
  7. JohnAbercrombie

    JohnAbercrombie Paddler

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    The spline is loose. I had the latch mechanism out of the paddle when I repaired it last week. (There's a plastic pin that holds the latch in the tube.)
    If the spline were tight, it would likely be a problem as it is a 'magnet' for grit.
     
  8. mick_allen

    mick_allen Paddler & Moderator

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    What do you think you're doing? Now you've got me peering down into the paddle like some idiot!

    Anyway, you know more than I, but the shown spline [your paddle, mine similar] inserts into a female spline that is inserted fairly tightly inside the paddle loom. There seems to be a good fit [in mine and maybe ideally] between the male spline and the female spline.
    How good the fit is between those two will determine whether the overlap should include that splined portion of the insert. . . . if it's worn, maybe not so good . . . if tightish, maybe ok to include.

    So the particular situation would determine. I would include it because even if a loose fit, upon loom failure even this inner part of the loom would still support the cantilever whereas the end of the female loom end is much more prone. It's just simple leverage, the smaller the lever arm the higher the stress or chance of failure for an equally strong loom situation [and they'll all vary anyway].
     
  9. JohnAbercrombie

    JohnAbercrombie Paddler

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    Mick:
    Agreed!
    :)
     
  10. Roy222

    Roy222 Paddler

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    Assume there engineering is sound, but was the system field tested?

    My first though is: everything fits to tight. What happens when salt and sand get in-between contact points.
    I think the system is flawed because there are 2 opposing contact points that lock the shafts together.
    Not having the actual part in my hand I am only guessing.
    The photo of the Werner shows a relief area in the joint that is probably intended to allow for some sand and salt to find and home away front the contact areas.
    Maybe, someone on this web site could request paddles to field test!

    Roy