Camera NOT for Paddling

Discussion in 'Paddling Photography' started by chodups, Oct 12, 2010.

  1. chodups

    chodups Paddler

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    Pardon me for posting this question here as it is not paddling related but I'm hoping that folks here will cut me a break and share their expertise.

    My wife needs a camera for climbing. She is not a camera nerd and will never be. She is a total point-and-shoot type and her Canon PS A2100 has delivered some really nice photos from a number of climbs. She finds it too big and heavy to wear around her neck and pull out of here parka so she misses lots of shots. Funny that a 5'2" woman carries a 60 pound pack without complaint but finds a Power Shot too heavy and bulky.

    So she is looking for something really thin that can slide out and slip back into a parka at altitude without fuss. Something that will hang very lightly around here neck. She's thinking something thin. Tons of features are lost on her and another couple of mega pixels cut no ice. Point and shoot, period. Yeah, it needs some telephoto but nothing out of the ORDINARY. I am totally without a clue.

    She is leaving for Aconcagua in February and for Denali in June. I would like for her to be able to return with some really good images.

    Ideas?

    Jon
    http://3meterswell.blogspot.com/
     
  2. Alana

    Alana Wave Seeker

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    I have an Olympus 1050SW shockproof and waterproof point and shoot. It's only shockproof to 3M, but if she keeps it tethered to her that should be fine. I believe that it is freezeproof, but I can't remember to what temperature. This camera is a couple of years old now, but it has survived everything that I have put it through (surfing, Skooks, skiing, being dropped multiple times by a clumsy paddler :oops: ). I'm not sure what Olympus' new tough cameras are called, but I can only imagine that they have made them even more rugged.
     

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  3. nhk750

    nhk750 Paddler

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    Yes, I use the Olympus for everything, it is a bomber camera! Mine has dents in it from Creek boating class V. I also have a full Canon 40D setup with L lenses and more accessories for my amature photography (money spending hobbie). I find I grab the Olympus more often than the big camera.

    I cant say enough good things about this camera, its waterproof, freezproof and drop proof, but it does lack a little bit when it comes to telephoto (only 3x), but it is very dependable and the battery last a good long time. It shoots pretty good video too.
     
  4. nomadic

    nomadic Paddler

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    Alana, can you tell me where you got that deck mount for your camera? Thanks.
     
  5. Alana

    Alana Wave Seeker

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    Nomadic, my boyfriend made it for me. He used a giant suction cup that is used to take dents out from a car body. He also made this mount, which can be positioned, but it's not as strong (the red suction cup can pick up my boat :big_thumb ). I have taken this mount surfing 6ft waves at Long Beach and it stayed on for the ride.
     

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  6. Tootsall

    Tootsall Paddler

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    This may be a silly question... but with the camera mounted that far away, how the heck do you manage to operate the buttons!?... poke 'em with the paddle?
     
  7. nomadic

    nomadic Paddler

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    Thanks Alana, I have a remote for my camera and am interested in building something like what you have there.
     
  8. Alana

    Alana Wave Seeker

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    Tootsall: Yup, I whack it with my paddle :D
     
  9. kisielk

    kisielk Paddler

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    I uses a Canon D10: http://www.canon.ca/inetCA/products?m=gp&pid=793 for all sorts of outdoors stuff including kayaking, skiing, climbing, etc. It's totally bomber, no amount of dropping or immersion has seemed to damage it at all. Maybe a bit bulkier than the Olympus one but I can vouch for its sturdiness :)
     
  10. Rrdstarr

    Rrdstarr Paddler

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    I know Tootsall has a Canon D-10........ :D
    A PowerShot is to big? I don't think they go smaller with good quality pictures.....
     
  11. Tootsall

    Tootsall Paddler

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    Yup, the D10 has a largish case on it that sometimes can be a hassle shoving in and out of the pocket of a PFD. OTOH, it (so far) seems bulletproof with no moving external parts (read "easily-jammed lens covers"). Can't wait to try out the video mode with underwater colour correction in March!

    But... the OT was to do with non-waterproof, but probably freeze-proof, probably "splash proof" (melted snow), and compact (slim?) cameras that'll take a shock or two without crapping out. The D10 is certainly all of those things with the exception of "slim"...it looks about like one of those fat little fish from the Little Mermaid movie! A possible drawback for mountain use is that it is fairly wide angle, as befits an underwater camera. I think you'd be looking for something with a bit more lens zoom than the 3X optical on the D10.
     
  12. chodups

    chodups Paddler

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    In this instance "slim" is the key characteristic.
     
  13. kisielk

    kisielk Paddler

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    In that case here is a review with a big list of all of them:
    http://reviews.photographyreview.co...ital-cameras/2/#outdoor_camera_recommendation

    I'd recommend against anything from Olympus since the image quality tends to be not as good as other brands, but in particular they have always tended to suffer from slow write speeds and big delays between taking photos. Either the Pentax or FujiFilm cameras are slim and rugged enough to do what you need, though the image quality is not quite as good as the Canon.
     
  14. chodups

    chodups Paddler

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  15. nick

    nick Paddler

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    Thanks for the link kisielk! We have an Olympus and the slow write speeds and big delays are driveing me nuts.
     
  16. Comoxpaddler

    Comoxpaddler Paddler

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    Canon D10

    Great image quality.

    Wider angle than I anticipated leading to some rather curvaceous horizons.

    Terrible water clearing from the glass. It would be great for diving, I suspect, and it takes an excellent photo on the beach, but for those who expect their camera to to able to transition quickly from water to air without smears of water on the glass, forget it. Major issue for those of us getting wet on the west coast, or rolling, or playing in splashy current. For this the Pentax W30 has been much better (sadly, reviews of the present W90 suggest that the picture quality is less good than for the W30).

    No experience of the Olympus.
     
  17. Tootsall

    Tootsall Paddler

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    Comox, I haven't found water clearing on the D 10 to be an issue: if anything I am surprised at how little it seems to mess up the photos. If I do see a lot of water droplets on the lens I generally just dip my camera back into the water quickly before taking a shot so the entire lens is wet rather than beaded. The greatest problem I've experienced (and it is pretty minor) is fogging of the inside surface of the lens coverglass due to the air humidity inside the camera case and temperature changes between under and over water and this happens more out on the coast where the humidity is a lot higher than here in S. Alberta. (Next someone will suggest nitrogen purge!!!! :wink: )

    On the beading thing though... I wonder if one could use some of that RainX. I tried it on my windshield once and found that although it did work for a while (a couple of weeks), eventually a dirty film built up that was a bear to remove so I personally won't be testing it on a camera.
     
  18. kisielk

    kisielk Paddler

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    One trick is to rub onion on the glass, keeps the water from sticking and doesn't affect the image quality.

    However, even when I don't do this, I find the images I take on the water don't suffer much from anything but the largest blobs.
     
  19. chodups

    chodups Paddler

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    Onion? Really.........I'll try it on my Pentax.
     
  20. Jurfie

    Jurfie Paddler

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    But for some reason, everyone in the photos is crying... :wink: