Fires

Discussion in 'General Paddling Discussions' started by ken_vandeburgt, Jan 13, 2011.

  1. Dan_Millsip

    Dan_Millsip Paddler & Admin

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    LOL. Awesome stuff guys. :clap:

    Bigbear, I understand what you are talking about and would have no problem visiting your campfire. :cool

    Actually, there's nothing funny about it. If you visit popular places -- especially those that are near population centers, you'll see the long-term damage that ill-informed or careless people have created. I don't see why there's a need to make a campfire right in the middle of a campsite when there's a perfectly good leave no trace tidal beach a few meters away. It's just plain dumb. But the thing of it is that as these places get more popular it also brings a lot of dumb people who do dumb things. I've been camping up Indian Arm regularly for the past 12 or so years and have seen a huge change in the place, especially over the last 3 or 4 years. The campsite isn't huge but every time I go up there now, there are fire pits all over the place. Many standing trees are cut or burnt. There are burn scars from fire pits all over the campsite (where it used to be nice grass). There's also more garbage and the outhouses seem to be always near full. It used to be almost exclusively kayakers but now there are a lot of powerboaters -- and while kayakers are sometimes far from perfect, the powerboaters are the ones that I see leaving the vast bulk of the garbage behind but it seems to be paddlers who are creating the fire pits. It's a pig sty and it's being destroyed by people. I've been there once in the last year and I'm no longer anxious to get there anymore.

    A big fire on the beach somewhere in the middle of nowhere? I've no problem with it. Really though, and I might be wrong about this, but I don't think that you guys and your bonfires is what this particular topic is about.
     
  2. nhk750

    nhk750 Paddler

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    You can tell when the weather is crappy, everyone is posting in here instead of paddling!

    I agree with everone here in different ways.

    Have a great fire and enjoy it, because that is why we go into the great outdoors, to enjoy, but just be carefull about lighting the woods on fire...and just use driftwood, no forest wood.
     
  3. Dan_Millsip

    Dan_Millsip Paddler & Admin

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    Hmmm... people post here even when the weather is great.
     
  4. bigbear

    bigbear Paddler

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    A "bigbear" fire with a pot of seafood chowder ready to consume.....

    [​IMG]
     
  5. Tatlow

    Tatlow Paddler

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    :?: Now what I really want to know are the answers to 2 vital questions Big Panda
    1. How do best clean off all the soot on a fire pot?
    2. Do you use cream in your chowder or just water?
     
  6. bigbear

    bigbear Paddler

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    LOL!!
    1/ I use those green scrubber pads, sand and water. Pads are great also for removing the "skin" from a fish when filleting...has a great "non slip" grab.
    2/ Cream!
     
  7. ken_vandeburgt

    ken_vandeburgt Paddler

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    Bend the rules and you too could be...uh...famous...or something.

    http://www.torresdelpaine.com/ingles/se ... ias/11.asp
     
  8. bigbear

    bigbear Paddler

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    Let me be a bit more explanatory as the entire thread, until I posted, was fires are a "no no". I have total respect that there are areas where a "fire" should not be permitted. However, there are areas, specifically the West Coast of Vancouver Island and most of the West Coast of British Columbia and Alaska where driftwood abounds and "dew/fog" is permanent year round. Even when fire bans are in effect through most of BC the West Coast perimeter is still open........fog/dew being the reason. As I stated earlier, impossible to start a fire in the woods from a spark...just never gets that dry on the perimeter of the West (Wet) Coast.
    Would I have a "fire", like I posted, in Desolation Sound...of course not. One, no driftwood, two, very dry.
    Personally, I prefer to paddle the exposed West Coast for both its beauty but also its abundance of driftwood and having the ability to enjoy a "fire" every night.
    Also, always amazes me how even on the exposed West(Wet)Coast I find people's fire pits with the common circular rocks. Why? Why scorch rocks? Why the rock perimeter? You're on a beach, in sand, the trees far away and on the "Wet Coast".....fire is not going anywhere! My posted pic has no rocks, it burns down to nothing and I have "burnt" sand. Kick the sand over and "no trace".
     
  9. ken_vandeburgt

    ken_vandeburgt Paddler

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  10. Dan_Millsip

    Dan_Millsip Paddler & Admin

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    Well, this is interesting.

    One one hand we've got Ken insinuating that every fire is going to result in the demise of a forest, and on the other hand, we've got BigBear (unnecessarily) defending his bonfire status campfires. Neither of which has anything to do with the original question in the first post of this discussion.

    Perhaps we can keep this discussion on topic -- which btw, I believe is about fires in areas where fire bans are in effect.
     
  11. bigbear

    bigbear Paddler

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    With all due respect Dan, I have to disagree. The heading of the topic is "Fires" and it is a very interesting thread. I only got involved as a friend was reading this thread and thought I might want to insert my thoughts. Threads often go into other areas BUT I feel this thread is still "basically" on topic, and quite interesting. You even stated "LOL. Awesome stuff guys.", in reply to a portion of this thread. So, in my humble opinion, lets not kill it, and hear others respond, in all aspects of "beach fires". A topic can always "expand".
    It has become a rather "entertaining" read lately. "Hot topics" are OK and always interesting, as ones values/morals, etc are exposed.

    "Bigbear, I understand what you are talking about and would have no problem visiting your campfire."

    .......maybe someday you will visit my campfire, I look forward to it!
     
  12. Tatlow

    Tatlow Paddler

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    mbiraman might get a kick out of this...just back from the David Suzuki Force of Nature movie...and a very emotive scene has him near his campfire high above the Slocan Valley at a lake he had finished with his father who was in failing health. Good enough for David good enough for the rest of us perhaps...Big Bear, you asked why the rocks for a fire. For me the answer is pretty easy. Helps stop those nasty embers that pop out of fires at times, a resting arm for hot dog or marshmellow sticks, hot rocks for the tent in winter and like tent rocks, have used them to lay wet clothes on to speed drying.
     
  13. Dan_Millsip

    Dan_Millsip Paddler & Admin

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    The topic might be just "Fires" but the first post sets the subject of the discussion as one of fires in places where bans are in effect.

    But if it's ok with the topic starter, it's ok with me for this topic to be a general discussion about fires.
     
  14. Stumpy

    Stumpy Paddler

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    This has been a very interesting thread , and I've been following it silently since it started. I learned how to make a proper campfire about 50 years ago, as a boy scout in Oregon Cascades, and have been improving that lesson ever since.
    When I was younger, I almost never made camp where there was any sign of a former campsite, prefering to hike another mile or two to find a "virgin" campsite, and, when I broke camp, I made sure it looked the same as when I arrived, only leaving a small stack of wood behind, or under a bush, log, or whatever, where it would remain relatively dry for whomever might want it.
    The basic rules we were taught were simple, easy to follow and, to my knowledge , I've never caused a forest fire. For reference, consult the boy scout handbook.
     
  15. mbiraman

    mbiraman Paddler

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    Now why are you draggin me back into this,,i don't eat hot dogs. (-;
     
  16. ken_vandeburgt

    ken_vandeburgt Paddler

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  17. drahcir

    drahcir Paddler

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    mbiraman wrote:
    "Now why are you draggin me back into this,,i don't eat hot dogs. (-;"

    In an emergency would you chew hot dogs or continue to eschew them?
    (I don't eat hot dogs either.)
    Which then raises another question: in an emergency, who is going to provide the hot dogs?

    Am I getting off topic? Well, fire me.
     
  18. bigbear

    bigbear Paddler

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