Storing boat

Discussion in 'Gear Talk' started by pawsplus, Feb 21, 2018.

  1. pawsplus

    pawsplus Paddler

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  2. JohnAbercrombie

    JohnAbercrombie Paddler

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    As long as the roof doesn't leak (to keep the boat from filling with water), I don't see any problem storing a glass boat right-side up.
     
  3. Astoriadave

    Astoriadave Paddler

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    Always right side up. Rotomolded plastic boats, if stored across 2 x 4's, right side up, can deform somewhat if they are in a really hot space. Glass boats? Never seen that happen.
     
  4. Peter-CKM

    Peter-CKM Paddler

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    I am with JohnA - only worry about it if water would get into it. This could cause 2 issues - overweighting the straps or however you are hoisting it and 2) if the water can freeze (and expand) inside the boat.

    But if it is easy to store upside down, why not do that.
     
  5. pawsplus

    pawsplus Paddler

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    It's in my carport and will never get wet. It's very protected. How do people store boats with the hatch covers removed and not have critters move in? I'm in the country and that sounds like a recipe for disaster.
     
  6. Astoriadave

    Astoriadave Paddler

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    In a rural area like yours, especially, critters are definitely a concern, neo cockpit covers or open. Rats, especially woodrats and packrats, love kayak cockpits as storehouses for their stash, and will chew a path right through neoprene. Raccoons, also. If you are a tidy cockpit person and do not leave food bits to entice them, the risk is small.

    A frugal buddy uses a double layer of plastic retired shower curtain material, tightly bungeed in place, and says no penetrations, 15 years outside.
     
  7. JohnAbercrombie

    JohnAbercrombie Paddler

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    I had 'something' chew up a foam seat that was in a kayak in my shed.
    I think the animal was just looking for a chew toy, or perhaps something salty - no food had ever been in that boat aside from lunch in a dry bag.
    After that I put nylon window screen over the cockpit and secured it with a shock cord loop (with a short rope 'pull loop' attached).
    I'd do the same with the open hatches if I was concerned.
    Perhaps the 'varmit' moved on, but I haven't had a repeat problem - though there are no foam seats in any of our boats these days...
     
  8. pawsplus

    pawsplus Paddler

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    Where do I find neoprene hatch covers to fit my boat? Because I can't leave the hatches just open.
     
  9. JohnAbercrombie

    JohnAbercrombie Paddler

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    I guess you are worried about mold growth in your warm weather with moisture in your compartments, if you leave the rubber covers on?
    Or wasps building a nest in your boat if you leave them off?
    (I leave the hatch covers on the hatches, but it's not very hot, even in summer in my kayak shed.)

    There isn't a very big lip on most hatch rims, so it might be tricky to find a neoprene cover that stayed attached.

    Do a web search on "sea kayak emergency hatch covers" and you will find info.

    If you can sew you could easily make storage hatch covers with (non waterproof, breathable) fabric and elastic.
     
  10. pawsplus

    pawsplus Paddler

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    I found a place that makes them but they are pretty pricey, esp. as I would need 4. I will try to sew them. :)
     
  11. pawsplus

    pawsplus Paddler

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    I wonder what a good fabric would be. Needs to be pretty sturdy, but not waterproof. Cordura nylon?? That's not waterproof unless a waterproofer is applied, right?
     
  12. JohnAbercrombie

    JohnAbercrombie Paddler

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    It depends on what the purpose of the covers is - just to keep out wasps, plain cotton or polyester/cotton with a drawstring or elastic would do the job. Old sheet or T-shirt material?

    Hanging the boat upside down will pretty much eliminate the mouse/squirrel possibility.

    Why not just leave the rubber covers on the boat? Some of the online advice about removing covers is because of UV damage concerns, I think.
     
  13. pawsplus

    pawsplus Paddler

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    I would prefer not to hang it upside down. The store from which I bought it always removes the hatch covers when storing. The website above says that the boat can absorb water from the inside--it's impossible to get it completely dry before putting on the hatch covers, so even if that's not a worry, mold is. I was a lot less precious about my other boat LOL.
     
  14. pawsplus

    pawsplus Paddler

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    Really, I guess the cockpit is the main concern. I have a fully waterproof, rubberized cockpit cover, which I got after the last trip when my non-waterproof one let tons of water into the boat while it sat on the Hullavator in the rain overnight. Often when I come back from a trip the cockpit is wet, even after sponging. So it's probably not a good idea to slap the waterproof cover on it and store it. The non-waterproof one went with the old boat, of COURSE, so I should get one for storage at home that is NOT waterproof.

    But you guys don't think I need to worry about leaving the hatch covers off? They are OK to leave on while it's stored?
     
  15. WGalbraith

    WGalbraith Paddler

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    I store my boat right side up, under a deck at my home. I leave the hatch covers off and usually place them inside the hatch so they won't blow away or get misplaced. Previously I had left them on and after a few wet, funky smelling openings, I now sponge out any moisture/ sand/dirt and leave them off . My boat rarely sits long enough for wasps or birds to nest and it would take a talented raccoon to get up to move in. When completely dry I frequently vacuum the hatches and cockpit to remove dirt, sand, dry seaweed etc.
     
  16. Peter-CKM

    Peter-CKM Paddler

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    If the manufacturer says to store off, I would store off. As WGalbraith said, pop them off and stuff back inside the hatches is an easy way to keep them from getting lost.

    That said, I store mine (not NDK) often with hatches on. My storage is inside an enclosed storage area, so chances of animals or water getting in is slim, so not leaving on for that. More leaving on for laziness.
     
  17. Man in qajaq

    Man in qajaq Paddler

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    I almost always leave my hatch covers on and never an issue other than sometimes a funky smell. I don't use cockpit covers. I occasionally wipe the hatch covers with a UV protector. The covers are years old and still watertight. My boats are stored inside an unheated garage.