WHERE DID YOU PADDLE? -- August 07

Discussion in 'Trip Reports' started by Astoriadave, Aug 6, 2007.

  1. Astoriadave

    Astoriadave Paddler

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    Sunday, four of us circumnavigated Long Island, a USFWS-controlled island in Willapa Bay, WA, in cool, relatively windless air. The Willapa is noted for its oysters, clams, and enormous tidal mud flats, exposed at mid-to low-tides. To make this 15 nm paddle, we launched as the tide fell, scooting north with the flow, passing across the soon-to-be-mud flats at the N end of the island, and making our way 3 nm south along its west side for a landing at one of the five primitive campsites. There, we lounged, ate, told lies, and did a couple hours of hiking on its retired, disappearing logging roads, waiting the required four hours for the water to return so we could complete the circuit. The last 5 nm were a breeze as the incoming tide swept us back to the launch ramp. A few scenes:

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    Paradise Point, east side of Long Island, looking south.

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    Bruce checks the chart, Stanley Point in the background.

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    Amphibious sprayer/mower, for control of invasive aquatic week, spartina alternaflora.

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    Terry admires air boat, used by Refuge staff to service CGs, and in weed control.

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    The tide falls, as we slog ashore at Sandspit CG. Here, the "mud" is very firm; in more protected backwaters, it is "pluff" mud, not capable of supporting body weight, and you sink in to your hips. "Slithering" the only safe way to escape its grasp.

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    Serious lounging commences ... five different chocolate variations?
     
  2. Islandboy

    Islandboy Paddler

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    Symphany Splash, Victoria Inner Harbour - quite the crowd, even on the water - well worth it though. :D

    Happy with the way the kayak went through the Tillicum narrows against a 3.6 knot tide :lol:
     
  3. seahorse

    seahorse New Member

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    A Sunday morning paddle around Virginia Key, off Miami. The heat index was over 100. Does it look hot?

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  4. waverider

    waverider Paddler

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    I and the g/f went up to Sasamat lake to pratice our ( mainly the g/f as she hasn't paddled much since last year)

    Even at 9:30 in the morning that place is busy!! We ended up going to the far side of the lake to avoid the crowds.

    To sum up my day in regards to my attempts at rolling the picture says it all. [​IMG]
     
  5. greg0rn

    greg0rn Paddler

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    Islandboy, we tried to go through the narrows at 23:15 and it was ebbing too fast already. According to Pacifica site, slack there supposed to be at 23:00. We ended up carrying the Klondike up to the road.
    What do you use for current predictions there?

    Other than that symphony and the young soloists were great.


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    Initially, the kayaking crowd was relaxed and social, but for the second half of the concert everybody was in coneseuristic concentration state, with the climax at Tchaikovsky's 1812 Overture.
     
  6. Islandboy

    Islandboy Paddler

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    I used the http://www.bigwavedave.ca site but have noticed the predictions there to be off slightly as well. :shock: We ran the narrows at 7:15 against a 3.6 flood and then at 9:30 when the flood was just about over. I have not any experiance with night paddling :oops: and did not trust the prediction enough to go through the narrows in the dark. Next year we may stay for the full show. :roll:

     
  7. ruthk

    ruthk Paddler

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    ahhh..so this is how the rich folk live! we had an unchecked 649 ticket at this point.. so we were 'imagining..' :roll:



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    me checkin' out Silver Falls..


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    whats all that yellow stuff?


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    went out for a night paddle.. the water was so nice and calm, and we seen some eagles, and lots and lots of seals! :D


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    this sailboat kinda looked outta control.. it was huge! (of course it doesn't look like it right now!) :roll:



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    and finally, the Granite Falls! cool place! 8) of course, my pics don't do it justice.. i need a better camera!! :wink:
     
  8. sushiy

    sushiy Paddler

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    Lynnwood, Washington, USA
    My weekend started with "Chase the Drunk Boaters at the Sea Fair" on Lake Washington on Saturday. Thanks to Chodups for teaching me how to catch the waves. Hundreds of power boats sped to catch the Blue Angels Air Show which creats wakes and wakes, some are too big for me that I was just heading against it, some were just good size for me to practice on. I did some good ride!!

    Sunday, I headed to Mt Rainier for 3day hiking/paddling solo trip. Arrived at Mowich Lake(5000feet up there), it was small lake but still there was some neat things to look at like seacret waterfal visible only from boat, and huge cliff with holes( caves??), and whole lake was so pretty and crystal clear ( I could see all the way to the bottom of it!!). Why I was there at such a small lake ( maybe 1.5k around?)?? Because it was perfect setting for practice, practice in the paradise!! Got aprove from the park ranger for my MK1stove setting for this non-open fire camp site with tin pan under neath with charcole, I just kept adding my fire strater/kindlings :wink:

    Monday, the sky was clear, I took some side trip hinking up to this highland meadow called Spray Park with huge Mt Rainier right there. I took whole bunch of pictures. BUT there is something wrong with the card, all the sudden, " memory card error" sign came on and it stop taking pictures :cry: :cry: :cry:
    Came back to Mowich Lake( my base camp), now it is time for upper body workout. Did some more paddling/practice. I did bunch of off side rolling practice, but couldn't get it done. Just to show people on the shore that I can do something, I did some of my on side roll practice without any failure (100% done 8)). So I did some C to C roll ( I think that's how it called, the one white waters do), 30%success.

    Tuesday, it was cloudy, but time to hike up to Tolmie Peak and Eunice Lake. Eunice Lake is a small alpine lake often portrated with reflaction of Mt.Rainier on some post cards. Someday I want to get a lightest folding kayak and carry it up to this lake and paddle. Why I want to paddle in such a small lake?? Because the beautiful body of water is there :) Pushed myself up to Tolmie Peak to wait 1 hour to have the fog cleared to see the Mt.Rainier, but it did not happen.
    Back to Mowich Lake, more paddling and practice. My off side rolling, I could feel my kayak rolled half, but that was just about it. I get confused under there.

    Wednesday, it was drizzly and cold. Time to get back home. It was a nice trip to the paradise. My favorite place.

    Sorry... I could not post any picture from my damaged memory card :cry:
     
  9. Astoriadave

    Astoriadave Paddler

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    Sushi, that side of Mt. Rainier NP is very scenic. I've been to all of thos spots you mention ... but, almost 40 years ago!!! :roll:

    Spray Park is lovely, but it must have very bad karma for flower photos. Your memory card died, and when I was there, I took an entire roll of photos, and found at the end I had failed to engage the film. :oops: :(

    Oh, yes, film. Does anybody remember film? :roll:
     
  10. sushiy

    sushiy Paddler

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    Hi A-Dave,
    I guess Lady of the Mountain dose not want to stuck in the photos. It is like she is saying " You have to come back to see more!!"

    Anyway, thank you for trying to understand my writing. I thought I ran spell check before I copied the writing, but I must have copied the before-spell-check writing... :oops:

    I think the Spray Park has not changed too much since you were there except the tree has been grown taller, the Mountain lost some of the glacier. Next year I will get the permit to do backpacking there.
     
  11. westcoastwill

    westcoastwill Paddler

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    Austria
    Sunday afternoon paddle on Attersee in the Gemini K2 with my GF Theresa.

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    It was a nice paddle, but i miss the westcoast!

    servus,

    :wink:

    Willi
     
  12. Dan_Millsip

    Dan_Millsip Paddler & Admin

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    Beautiful BC
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    It's lichen. Not sure ot the specific name but I've seen it in a few other places. Amazingly bright isn't it? Almost looks like someone painted the rock with flourescent paint.

    One of our earlier wallpaper images is a cliff location on Pitt Lake that has the same kind of green lichen. The black stuff on the rock is a different type of lichen:

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    *****
     
  13. cyberhun

    cyberhun Paddler

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    I did it! I camped overnight on Tremble Island in Nakwakto Rapids, Seymour Inlet.
    I had concluded that I was probably not going to be able to land my kayak on Tremble Island after looking long and hard at it from the nearby shore --- the sides were simply much too steep, sheer rock. I discussed this the day before with a longline fisherman who was overnighting in Shelter Bay and mentioned that I was contemplating improvising some kind of grappling hook that maybe I could throw onto Tremble Island and then pull myself into it, and he said he had one and voila! I had a grappling hook. But after thinking about it some more, and especially the fact that I was solo, and one little slip up could be deadly, I decided against using the hook. I thought I was probably going to have to content myself with just circling Tremble Island, but guess what? There was a 'step' in the gently sloping rock on the north east corner, at exactly the right place AND a thick, solid-looking rope that was exactly where it needed to be for me to grab the rope and pull myself up and out of the kayak, and then pull the kayak up after me. I tested the rope a couple times before committing myself to putting my whole weight on it, but I knew that if it did break, the consequences of a fall could be catastrophic because even at slack the water is still moving and although I'd probably manage to scramble ashore, if I became seperated from the kayak, it would be all over. The rope held. When I found myself actually sitting on Tremble Island with my kayak pulled up beside me, I couldn't quite beleive I'd done it, after all that planning and anticipation, but I had! It was quite a feeling of accomplishment tempered with the knowledge that it was only half the battle --- I still had to get back IN the kayak...
    There's little trails all over Tremble Island --- I wasn't expecting that. They are quite overgrown, though, and I badly scratched my legs walking through the bushes. I was able to barely fit my tent on one of the little flat areas, with one corner hanging off the edge, and had a spectacular view of the wake being thrown off by the Island. A couple of those funny, awkward-looking seabirds with red feet that can barely takeoff on hot days nest there, and I heard something large moving through the undergrowth late at night and the instant I turned my headlamp on --- splash! It jumped into the water. Probably a seal or an otter maybe. It's an eery place at night in the fog with a near-full moon. The weather forcast was for straight northwesterly type weather so I didn't put the tent fly up, just the bug-net part so I could see all around and the skies too. I only wish I had a camera to record the amazing wake the island throws off. It's like being a rock boat, 15 meters in diameter, moving at 18 knots through the water. It feels like the island is moving and the water is staying still --- as long as you look down at the water. It was a memorable experience.
    The noise was incredible. At slack tide, six hours after I landed, I was sleeping and the silence woke me up. But it sure didn't take long for the roaring to start again.
    Sea level on one side of the island was a meter and a half higher than the other side, and you can stand on the downstream side and look up at water. You don't see sloping water very often.
    There's a lot of signs of the names of other boats who've gone through Nakwakto, and I left a modest calling card. I wrote, "Tom the kayaker was here. I'm interested in hearing from others who've made it here" and put my email address. It's on a sheet of paper, in a ziplock freezer bag, and tied to a tree on the raised area --- it can't be seen from a boat, one would have to actually land on the island to see it. The last line I added to the bottom was, "God, help me get back into my kayak."
    It turned out to be not that hard, really.
    As to the question of whether or not Tremble Island actually trembles --- yes and no. It doesn't tremble as in a vibrating or oscillating way, but when the water really starts ripping (and it's been measured at 18 knots) what happens is that cavitation occurs near the surface, and it's the shockwaves from when these cavities collapse that travel through the rock and you can feel the thud and boom from this violent turbulence. It's like standing on a rocky shore watching huge ocean rollers break on a rock shore and feeling it through your feet, slightly --- I've read that when the really large surf off Hawaii's north coast comes rolling in, seismometers can measure it from long distances away. So, in a sense it does tremble but not like the popular image of it is. It's much milder and less noticeable than if it were actually vibrating.
    I carried on up Seymour Inlet a short distance and although I couldn't find anywhere to camp on shore, there was a large dock in a bay that I pitched my tent on overnight because it was getting dark and I needed a place to stay.
    The next morning a boat full of loggers came speeding over and I thought to myself, "I'm caught." But they were all friendly. They worked for Cougar Inlet Logging.
    Then I continued up the coast and spent a few days at Burnett Bay --- what a gorgeous place that is. Constant grey whale activity in the bay, and eagles and wolves and the symphony of the surf and wind in the trees was awesome as always. I love that bay, and it's funky little cabin on the north end which I found this time, and retrieved the latest cabin log entries for Randy (the cabin's builder).
    Unfortunately, on my last trip, I had no camera because I dunked it in salt water and it died. I just bought a new one, though, and may be going on another trip next week.
    During the entire two weeks, I encountered other kayakers only once --- on my way back, at Shelter bay. It was a small group of guided yakkers, and the company was called Kingfisher Ecotours or something. They got picked up by water taxi instead of crossing QC Sound like I do. They seemed like decent folks and it was good of them to leave me their freshwater supply.
    In any case, I bought another camera now and next trip will have photos. You guys will just have to beleive on this one --- although I did leave proof of my visit on the island if anybody else from these forums ever goes there ...
     
  14. cyberhun

    cyberhun Paddler

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    This picture shows the routes I took crossing QC Sound northbound green and red, southbound in blue. Both ways I waited for it to be glassy smooth, and on the way back (blue line) I covered the whole distance in the morning while the (light fog, not zero-zero) fog was still around and no wind, but within an hour of landing back at Storey's Beach a wicked north westerly had blown up.
    The cut between the two large islands in the Deserter's chain is a cool place, with wrecks of old wooden trollers decaying quietly on a beach.
     
  15. cyberhun

    cyberhun Paddler

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    pic

    i'm trying to up;load a picture.

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  16. cyberhun

    cyberhun Paddler

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    why is the picture not appearing on the webpage?

    why is the picture not appearing on the webpage?
    it uploads and then disappears somewhere.
    lol
     
  17. Jurfie

    Jurfie Paddler

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    Re: why is the picture not appearing on the webpage?

    Are you trying to link to photo-hosting site, or did you try the new "upload picture" feature? If you tried the upload, check the file size; sometimes the bigger files can be problematic. :)
     
  18. cyberhun

    cyberhun Paddler

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    It was filesize. Buddy said he'd downsize it and post it when he has a minute.
     
  19. cyberhun

    cyberhun Paddler

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    [​IMG]
    OK, this is downsized to 90k from 1.5mb, and it uploads fine.
     
  20. Astoriadave

    Astoriadave Paddler

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    Cyber wrote: I've read that when the really large surf off Hawaii's north coast comes rolling in, seismometers can measure it from long distances away.

    Very impressive visit to Tremble Island! Bet you'll rmember that for a while.

    Re: picking up "surf beat:" we used to pick it up here, about 20 miles from the beach, on a homemade seismometer, when it would get to 10-12 feet of more.